Disclosures – Richard Reisman’s interests relating to FairPay

FairPay is a pro-bono project.
  • FairPay is not a product – it is an architecture that has been fully disclosed in widely available publications. I have no proprietary rights to that architecture.
  • I have been developing the concepts, promoting them, collaborating with others, and offering to assist in trials and applications, at no charge.
  • I have put significant effort into this work (and some expense), and expect to continue to do so, because I believe this is an important breakthrough that will have significant benefit to society.
  • My primary objective is to drive awareness, proof of concept testing, refinement, and wide adoption of this strategy.  I welcome collaborators in this work.
  • I do not seek or expect personal monetary enrichment from this effort (except for modest royalties from the publisher of my book).  

Details on Intellectual Property
  • Patent rights - public domain:  During the early development of the FairPay concept I filed a US patent application (number 13/113,678, filed 5/23/11, with priority to a provisional application filed 6/9/10). In order to encourage the widest possible uptake, I have expressly abandoned that patent application, releasing all my related patent rights into the public domain. This application published as a public teaching in 2011, and is available at no charge from the Patent Office or Google Patents. (Google reports this application was cited as prior art in 62 subsequent patent applications as of 1/31/17, thus serving to restrict new patents by others.) 
  • Trademark - public domain: I have used the name FairPay with no intent to file for a trademark.
  • FairPayZone Blog Copyright:  My blog is freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike License.
  • FairPay Book Copyright:  I own the copyright for my book, FairPay: Adaptively Win-Win Customer Relationships, and expect modest royalties from the publisher (Business Expert Press). I would welcome opportunities to license portions of it at no charge for republication in other forms.

Richard Reisman - 2/3/17